Yew               Idho              (Transition)

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Ioho, Idho corresponds to the letter I in the Ogam alphabet and is associated with the Yew tree. This symbol represents transition, endings and change.

Idho pronounced: Ed-yoh

Status: Peasant-tree

Element: Air

Gender: Masculine

Powers: Idho represents rebirth and transformation

 

Keywords: Rebirth, everlasting life and death, the eternal cycle, complete change in life direction or attitude, transformation.

 

Deities associated with Yew: Banbha, Dione, Artemis, Persephone, Hecate, Astarte, Odin and the Crone aspect of the triple Goddess.

 

Interesting Spiritual Information: Yew is used to enhance magical and psychic abilities and induce visions. Transformation, reincarnation, eternal life and immortality sum up its attributes. It is associated with death, rebirth, change and regeneration. Yews place you in contact with your past. Your spiritual strength is renewed, your life is given fresh energy and you are able to understand, through the wisdom that was always there but you may have forgotten or ignored, what was, is and always will be. Yew is another important Winter Solstice tree, working with the deities of death and rebirth.

 

Ogam Channel Healing: Attitude; Change in life direction; Dealing with death; Death, dying and beyond; Expansion; Finding the peace in your heart; Higher purpose; Life purpose; Linking in with ancestors; Linking with divinity; Rebirth; Epilepsy; Transformation (diets, life expression etc); Unblocking life purpose; Tonsillitis; Asthma; Bronchitis; Indigestion; Tapeworms; Liver; Bladder issues; Breast cancer; Lung cancer; Ovarian cancer; Prostate cancer; Pains; Rheumatism…    

 

More Medical information and in-depth healing suggestions can be found in my book The Beginners Book of Ogam Tree Healing, or by attending one of my workshops.

 

Notes: Yews are often found in graveyards, or old sacred places of power. They grow in a unique way, their branches grow down to form new stems which become the trunks of new trees, whilst still linked to the original tree. A new tree can also grow from the decaying mass of the old trunk.

 

Folklore: In early times, the darkly glorious yew-tree was probably the only evergreen tree in Britain. Both Druids with their belief in reincarnation, and later Christians with their teaching of the resurrection, regarded it as a natural symbol of everlasting life. The fact that it could reach a great age enriched this symbolic value.